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This week’s episode of the podcast dives into a recent study involving prostate cancer and lifestyle. 

Yes, lifestyle gents. I have discussed this topic in length in previous episodes of the podcast involving health and nutrition and how vital of a role it plays in your urological health. 

You see, lifestyle medicine is real. It is not window dressing. And a recent study showed that a healthy lifestyle can reduce prostate cancer by 45 percent. 45 percent is not a small number. That is a significant reduction in prostate cancer. And it all can be done through lifestyle changes such as exercise, meditation, and eating nutrient-dense foods. 

Let’s get into it!

 

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EPISODES NOTES

Treat the Terrain

The lifestyle approaches that you want to make happen at a cellular level. They go much deeper than you think and when you understand that, you’ll commit much more to make those changes. 

The changes needed are not easy to make. It requires intention and commitment to improving your urological health. Of course, it would be much easier to take a pill that would just do all of the work for you, right? If that were the case, we would be trillionaires! But that’s not how it is. You and I both know that work and commitment is required and it starts with treating the terrain. 

Treating the terrain means going beyond the aesthetic appearances. It’s going to the root, the internal health. It’s nutrition, it’s diet, it’s mental health. It’s more than just muscles and a six-pack. It’s strengthening your body and your mind. 

This study proved it, regardless of genetic disposition to having cancer. You can give yourself a chance to never get prostate cancer by creating new and exciting habits that will benefit your life. 

Exercise is Important to Prostate Health

I took a bit of a deeper dive into exercise a couple of episodes back on the podcast and in the episode, I talked about the impact of exercise on your physical health. As it relates to this study and prostate cancer, four to six hours of exercise a week is a great place to see the benefits although many of the studies I have read suggest three hours of physical movement or activity. 

The goal of your training is moderate to high intensity. You want to get your heart rate up, your intensity up, and challenge yourself. For example, if you’re lifting 20 pounds and you do 25 repetitions and you still think you could do 25 more, that weight is too light.

I encourage you to push yourself more, to do more if you’re able. That’s where the real growth happens for your body and health. 

The Best Diet for Prostate Cancer

A plant-based diet seems to be the best diet for prostate cancer. You may have heard that the ketogenic diet is good for cancer but this is prostate cancer and it behaves differently than other cancers like brain cancer or pancreatic cancer. So maybe ketogenic diets work well for those types of cancer but for prostate cancer, plant based is the way to go. 

You’ll want to include foods like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, or any type of cruciferous vegetable. If you want to include protein, salmon is a good option. 

Another aspect of the diet is incorporating fasting every day for 12-16 hours giving your body a break from eating. Not eating for periods of time has a lot of anti-cancer benefits so I encourage you to slowly integrate fasting into your habits and routine. 

Also, you’ll want to find ways to integrate botanicals into your diet that provide anti-inflammatory benefits such as ginger, curcumin, and grape seed extract. Having these plus your diet will allow for max benefits and aid in the prevention of getting prostate cancer. 

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