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The prostate is so important for men’s health that it sometimes can be a pain in the rear. 

And I say that because BPH stands for benign prostatic hyperplasia which is the medical term for an enlarged prostate. It’s a very common occurrence in men as they age and this week on the Dr. Geo Podcast, I did an episode on BPH, what you can do to improve your BPH condition and some natural methods that will help. 

Let’s get into it. 

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EPISODES NOTES

What is Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

BPH stands for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Hyperplasia means duplication of cells or multiplication of cells, Many of these cells accumulate and cause enlargement of the specific organ. In this case, it’s the prostate. 

The reason why this matters is that men generally do not care about having BPH. What they care about is the urinary dysfunction that’s associated with BPH. A bigger prostate does not lead to prostate cancer, however, if the prostate does get really big, then it can interfere with nerve function and potentially, erections. 

One thing you do want to look out for is LUTS which stands for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms when it comes to BPH. 

What Are The Symptoms of Urinary Problems Associated With BPH

One of the main symptoms you have with urinary problems associated with BPG is that you have a weak urinary stream. Sometimes you develop incontinence, urinary incontinence. And the bigger problem is that if there’s a lot of urine backflow, which means that the transitional zone of the prostate squeezes to the point where you cannot urinate and this would cause urinary retention which is excruciating and painful. 

If your urinary stream continues to be weak and you have an excess accumulation of urine after you’ve stopped urinating in your bladder, that can cause a backflow of urine, not only to the bladder but to the kidneys. 

I do want to stress that BPH only presents problems if it is squeezing the urethra. If you are suffering from what I stated above with urinary incontinence, a weak stream, or excruciating pain, please see a medical professional immediately. 

What Natural Approaches Work for BPH

One of the natural approaches that work for BPH involves Saw Palmetto. It’s the most popular botanical used for BPH and it does work but often it doesn’t work in severe situations where that IPS number is really high. Saw Palmetto will not work in those situations. To be fair, most things don’t work when IPSS is incredibly high but I believe that at higher dosages, Saw Palmetto will work around the 720mg range. 

I also like curcumin for reducing BPH symptoms as well as quercetin which is an excellent inflammatory botanical. While I love natural approaches and am passionate about helping you live more optimally through natural approaches, the best approach to reducing BPH and improving your health comes down to diet and lifestyle. 

You have to treat metabolic syndrome and work on reducing belly size and weight. Big bellies are associated with bigger prostates and those are associated with urinary problems. The sooner you can work on your waist line and do this through the low carb lifestyle, intermittent fasting mixed with exercise, you can do a whole lot of good for your health. 

It’s important that every man takes care of themselves and diet and exercise are the two main ways you can reduce symptoms of BPH and improve your overall health very quickly. 

This episode was jam-packed with a whole lot more so check it out now wherever you get your podcasts.

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